Man Mo Temple – Literature God and Martial God Worship

man mo temple image

Man Mo Temple Hong Kong

Man Mo Temple is dedicated to the Literature God (Man Tai/ Man Cheong) and the Martial God (Mo Tai/ Kwan Tai). There are a number of Man Mo Temples in Hong Kong. The most popular one is located on Hollywood Road in Sheung Wan. It is one of the oldest Chinese temple that built in the colonial period.

Man Mo Temple Sheung Wan has over 160 years of history. It is a Grade I historic building and also a Declared Monument. It was estimated to be built between 1847-1862 by wealthy Chinese businessmen.

Man Mo Temple – the statues and the worshippers

Inside the Temple, you can find the statues of the Literature God and the Martial God. The Literature God, Man Tai,  is wearing a robe and holding a writing brush, while the Martial God, Mo Tai, is wearing a green robe and holding a sword. Do you know what kinds of people worship these two gods? And why do they respect them?

The Literature God is mostly worshiped by scholars and students, especially those who want to do well in their exams and make progress. The Martial God, who represents loyalty and power, is widely worshiped by different associations and the police. Of course, the Gods are respected by the general public.

man mo temple hk lit shing kung

The Ma Mo Temple compound also houses the Lit Shing Kung and Kung Sor. Lit Shing Kung is a place to worship various heavenly gods. Kung Sor was an important assembly hall where community affairs and disputes were often discussed and settled.

Little Story:

When Hong Kong was first established by the British, the legal system was not well developed. The oath that Chinese people taken in the Temple is legally binding. They used to write down the sworn statement on yellow paper, burn the paper, and then sacrifice a live chicken when they take an oath.

Man Mo Temple HK – Architecture and Treasure

Man Mo Temple complex is a typical traditional Chinese folk architecture, decorated with exquisite pottery, granite carvings, wood carvings, plasterwork and wall paintings. The Temple also has two artifacts with more than two hundred years of history, including a Qing Dynasty Bronze Bell and an official sedan chair.

The Temple was formally entrusted to Tung Wah Hospital in 1908. Up to now, Tung Wah Board and community leaders still gather at the Temple every year for Autumn Sacrificial Rites in order to pay homage to Man Tai and Mo Tai as well as to invoke the prosperity of Hong Kong.

Man Mo Temple represents the traditional social organization and religious practices of the Chinese community in old Hong Kong. It is of great historical and social significance to the city.

The Temple is just a few steps away from the bustling business centre and Soho area, what a contrast! Why not pay a visit, have a look inside, and pray for health, wealth, happiness and peace under the giant hanging incense coils.

man mo temple hong kong image

You may want to see more photos of the Temple taken by a local tour guide from Yorkshire, find the image of the bronze bell by Mar, and watch a short video by Mr French. More photos and reviews by an US expat family and a Manchester photographer.

Opening hours and how to get there

Man Mo Temple Hollywood Road opens daily from 8 am to 6 pm. The admission is free.

Address:  124-126, 128 & 130 Hollywood Road, Sheung Wan

Official Website: http://www.lcsd.gov.hk/ce/Museum/Monument/en/monuments_96.php

  • MTR Central Station Exit D2, turn right to Theatre Lane. Walk along Queen’s Road Central towards The Center (Sheung Wan). Then take the Central—Mid-Levels Escalator to Hollywood Road.
  • MTR Sheung Wan Station Exit A2, walk along Hillier Street to Queen’s Road Central. Then go up Ladder Street (next to Lok Ku Road) to Hollywood Road to the Man Mo Temple.
  • Bus – Take the Bus 26 outside Pacific Place at Admiralty to Hollywood Road, get off near Man Mo Temple.

Have you been to Man Mo Temple or any other temples in Hong Kong?

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